Around the World

How the savvy female traveller can stay safe, fit and healthy when travelling the world

Photo from http://www.flickr.com/photos/lululemonathletica/4604432708/

Photo from http://www.flickr.com/photos/lululemonathletica/4604432708/

Travelling is one of the greatest things you can do with your life, as we all know. But it helps if you’re prepared, fit, and healthy before you head out the door. Here’s a few tips to stay savvy and stay ahead of the game.

Selecting the best medical insurance coverage

Step number one: get insured. For even a short trip, travel insurance is one hundred per cent necessary. Many head out on their travels thinking they’re tough enough to withstand the worst eventualities and insurance is a costly luxury. The reality is, you stand to pay far more without insurance if the unthinkable happens. Insurance helps out with everything from the little things to the big, serious things – from replacing lost luggage to emergency medical evacuation.

Buying travel insurance can be a minefield and it’s important to choose coverage that’s suitable for your trip, your age, and your pre-existing medical conditions (if any). When picking an insurer, you’re best off going with a well-known specialist like Insureandaway.co.uk who offer a range of different insurance options including unlimited cover all year round.

How to eat healthily on the road

If you’re constantly on the move, it’s easy to fall into a habit of unhealthy snacking, or worse, the occasional binge on junk food. This is never a good idea, especially if your travels take the form of physical activities like hiking which require lots of energy. You might think it’s common sense, but it bears repeating: eat plenty fresh fruit and vegetables to keep your vitamin C, energy levels, and overall health at a positive level.

You should also make sure you’re properly hydrated, especially if you’re in a hot country where you can get easily dehydrated. At a minimum, be sure to drink at least 1.5 litres of fluid a day, more if you’re undertaking heavy physical activity. Carry a water bottle with you at all times (a water purifying bottle is useful where tap water could make you ill).

Coping with the constant battle of the dreaded hostel communal kitchen

Communal kitchens are the eternal foe of the ever-moving traveller. They’re often crowded, sometimes appallingly unhygienic, and there is always the threat of opportunist thieves looking to steal whatever food they can find. Many travellers opt to label their food, which generally does the trick, invoking the ‘trust factor’. And you can always opt to avoid hassle and awkwardness by sharing a meal with your new friends.

Photo from http://www.flickr.com/photos/costa-rica-beauty/4751184585/

Photo from http://www.flickr.com/photos/costa-rica-beauty/4751184585/

Incorporating a fitness regime into your daily routine

Staying in shape is really important in general, but especially so when you’re constantly on the move. If you’re lugging a backpack round the world and carrying half your weight up a mountain range, you’ll need to be near the peak of your fitness. Learn a few yoga or Pilates stretches that can be done anywhere and get into the routine of starting your day with a short warm-up. Why not take up jogging – a quick dawn run is a perfect way to explore the area you’re visiting.

Finding a balance between foreign and familiar foods

If you’re going on an adventure, you should try to be adventurous! One of the singular pleasures of travelling is experiencing new and unexpected things, and food ranks highly in the ‘new experiences’ list. Be bold and dive into new cuisines that you might not even give the time of day back home. But don’t completely forget home comforts – it’s worth packing a few of your favourite snacks with you, so should homesickness rear its ugly head, you have a small but yummy consolation.

Editor’s note: Insure & Away has generously provided compensation for this post in order to help continue spreading the voice of women around the world. However, the opinions we express are our own, and we are proud of them! Click here to read our full disclosure statement.

Tracey Chandler
Tracey used to be Head of Dance, Drama and Literature in a secondary school in London. At the age of 27, she decided to head off to the mountains in Venezuela with her life in her backpack in order to be a freelance writer. She had no home to go to in Venezuela, no job, no experience as a writer, no source of income, and she couldn't speak Spanish either (although now she speaks Spanish, French and Portuguese). When she thinks about what she did now, it makes her a little nervous. She can't believe how brazen she was, but it was the best thing she ever did.

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